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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 16, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 3935–3944, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-16-3935-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Hydrology education in a changing world

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 3935–3944, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-16-3935-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 01 Nov 2012

Research article | 01 Nov 2012

Experiences from online and classroom education in hydroinformatics

I. Popescu, A. Jonoski, and B. Bhattacharya I. Popescu et al.
  • UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands

Abstract. Universities and other higher education institutions involved in water-related engineering education are facing new challenges in offering lifelong learning services and online educational support. Both the curricula and the form of delivery are changing, as contemporary water problems require interdisciplinary approaches involving diverse and up to date expertise maintained via continuous professional development. Hydroinformatics education faces similar challenges in developing relevant curricula and finding appropriate combinations of course delivery to its target group. This article presents experiences from delivering two hydroinformatics courses in the fields of flood modelling for management (FMM) and decision support systems (DSS) in river basin management that in recent years have been delivered both online and in classroom settings. Comparisons between the two modes of delivery are provided, with the conclusion that online education in this field, although still faced with many challenges, has a promising potential for meeting future educational needs.

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