Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.936 IF 4.936
  • IF 5-year value: 5.615 IF 5-year
    5.615
  • CiteScore value: 4.94 CiteScore
    4.94
  • SNIP value: 1.612 SNIP 1.612
  • IPP value: 4.70 IPP 4.70
  • SJR value: 2.134 SJR 2.134
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 107 Scimago H
    index 107
  • h5-index value: 63 h5-index 63
Volume 16, issue 3
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 967–982, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-16-967-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 967–982, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-16-967-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 26 Mar 2012

Research article | 26 Mar 2012

The Southern Annular Mode: a comparison of indices

M. Ho, A. S. Kiem, and D. C. Verdon-Kidd M. Ho et al.
  • Environmental and Climate Change Research Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia

Abstract. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) has been identified as a climate mechanism with potentially significant impacts on the Australian hydroclimate. However, despite the identification of relationships between SAM and Australia's hydroclimate using certain data sets, and focussed on certain time periods, the association has not been extensively explored and significant uncertainties remain. One reason for this is the existence of numerous indices, methods and data sets by which SAM has been approximated. In this paper, the various SAM definitions and indices are reviewed and the similarities and discrepancies are discussed, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each index development approach. Further, the sensitivity of the relationship between SAM and Australian rainfall to choice of SAM index is quantified and recommendations are given as to the most appropriate index to use when assessing the impacts of the SAM on Australia's hydroclimate. Importantly this study highlights the need to consider the impact that the choice of SAM index, and data set used to calculate the index, has on the outcomes of any SAM attribution study.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation