Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3149-3166, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-3149-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
04 Aug 2016
Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment
Sebastian Huizer1,2, Gualbert H. P. Oude Essink1,2, and Marc F. P. Bierkens1,2 1Department of Physical Geography, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
2Unit Subsurface and Groundwater Systems, Deltares, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Abstract. The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) – also called sand replenishment or nourishment – was placed on the Dutch coast. The intention is that the sand is redistributed by wind, current, and tide, reinforcing local coastal defence structures and leading to a unique, dynamic environment. In this study we investigated the potential effect of the long-term morphological evolution of the large sand replenishment and climate change on fresh groundwater resources. The potential effects on the local groundwater system were quantified with a calibrated three-dimensional (3-D) groundwater model, in which both variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport were simulated. Model simulations showed that the long-term morphological evolution of the Sand Engine results in a substantial growth of fresh groundwater resources, in all adopted climate change scenarios. Thus, the application of a local sand replenishment could provide coastal areas the opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of the local fresh groundwater availability.

Citation: Huizer, S., Oude Essink, G. H. P., and Bierkens, M. F. P.: Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3149-3166, https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-3149-2016, 2016.
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The anticipation of sea-level rise has led to an innovative project called the Sand Engine, where a large volume of sand was placed on the Dutch coast. The intention is that the sand is redistributed by wind, current and tide, reinforcing coastal defence structures. Model simulations show that this large sand replenishment can result in a substantial growth of fresh groundwater resources. Thus, sand replenishments could combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh groundwater resources.
The anticipation of sea-level rise has led to an innovative project called the Sand Engine,...
Share