Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.256 IF 4.256
  • IF 5-year value: 4.819 IF 5-year 4.819
  • CiteScore value: 4.10 CiteScore 4.10
  • SNIP value: 1.412 SNIP 1.412
  • SJR value: 2.023 SJR 2.023
  • IPP value: 3.97 IPP 3.97
  • h5-index value: 58 h5-index 58
  • Scimago H index value: 99 Scimago H index 99
Volume 22, issue 7 | Copyright

Special issue: HESS Opinions

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 3589-3599, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-3589-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Opinion article 04 Jul 2018

Opinion article | 04 Jul 2018

HESS Opinions: Science in today's media landscape – challenges and lessons from hydrologists and journalists

Stefanie R. Lutz1, Andrea Popp2,3, Tim van Emmerik4,5, Tom Gleeson6, Liz Kalaugher7, Karsten Möbius8, Tonie Mudde9, Brett Walton10, Rolf Hut4, Hubert Savenije4, Louise J. Slater11, Anna Solcerova4, Cathelijne R. Stoof12, and Matthias Zink13,a Stefanie R. Lutz et al.
  • 1Department of Catchment Hydrology, UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle, Germany
  • 2Department Water Resources & Drinking Water, Eawag, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
  • 3Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland
  • 4Water Resources Section, Delft University of Technology, Stevinweg 1, 2628 CN Delft, the Netherlands
  • 5Amsterdam Institute for Metropolitan Solutions, Mauritskade 62, 1092 AD Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • 6Department of Civil Engineering and School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
  • 7environmentalresearchweb, IOP Publishing, Bristol, UK
  • 8Mitteldeutscher Rundfunk, Leipzig, Germany
  • 9De Volkskrant, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • 10Circle of Blue, Traverse City, MI 49684, USA
  • 11Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK
  • 12Soil Geography and Landscape Group, Wageningen University and Research, Droevendaalsesteeg 3, 6708 PB Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • 13Department Computational Hydrosystems, UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
  • anow at: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Shinfield Park, RG2 9AX Reading, UK

Abstract. Media such as television, newspapers and social media play a key role in the communication between scientists and the general public. Communicating your science via the media can be positive and rewarding by providing the inherent joy of sharing your knowledge with a broader audience, promoting science as a fundamental part of culture and society, impacting decision- and policy-makers, and giving you a greater recognition by institutions, colleagues and funders. However, the interaction between scientists and journalists is not always straightforward. For instance, scientists may not always be able to translate their work into a compelling story, and journalists may sometimes misinterpret scientific output. In this paper, we present insights from hydrologists and journalists discussing the advantages and benefits as well as the potential pitfalls and aftermath of science–media interaction. As we perceive interacting with the media as a rewarding and essential part of our work, we aim to encourage scientists to participate in the diverse and evolving media landscape. With this paper, we call on the scientific community to support scientists who actively contribute to a fruitful science–media relationship.

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Media play a key role in the communication between scientists and the general public. However, the interaction between scientists and journalists is not always straightforward. In this opinion paper, we present insights from hydrologists and journalists into the benefits, aftermath and potential pitfalls of science–media interaction. We aim to encourage scientists to participate in the diverse and evolving media landscape, and we call on the scientific community to support scientists who do so.
Media play a key role in the communication between scientists and the general public. However,...
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