Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.936 IF 4.936
  • IF 5-year value: 5.615 IF 5-year
    5.615
  • CiteScore value: 4.94 CiteScore
    4.94
  • SNIP value: 1.612 SNIP 1.612
  • IPP value: 4.70 IPP 4.70
  • SJR value: 2.134 SJR 2.134
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 107 Scimago H
    index 107
  • h5-index value: 63 h5-index 63
Volume 8, issue 3 | Copyright

Special issue: Sustainability of UK upland forestry: contemporary issues...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 422-435, 2004
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-8-422-2004
© Author(s) 2004. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  30 Jun 2004

30 Jun 2004

An analysis of the long-term variation in stream water quality for three upland catchments at Loch Dee (Galloway, S.W. Scotland) under contrasting land management

S. J. Langan1 and D. Hirst2 S. J. Langan and D. Hirst
  • 1Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, Scotland, AB15 8QH, UK
  • 2Norwegian Computing Centre, P.O. Box 114, Blindern, N-0414 Oslo, Norway
  • Email for corresponding author: s.langan@macaulay.ac.uk

Abstract. A long term record of water chemistry, consisting of twenty years of weekly spot samples, from three sub-catchments draining into a loch and the loch outflow in Galloway, S.W. Scotland have been analysed. The analysis undertaken consisted of a three component statistical trend model. The technique allows the identification of long-term, seasonal and short-term trends, as well as differentiation between base flow and high flow responses. The land usage in the three sub-catchments is moorland, forest and forest plus lime. The results show that, since the mid-1980s, there has been a gradual decline in stream-water sulphate of the same order as reductions in the deposition of non-marine sulphate. Superimposed on this trend are somewhat random but considerable perturbations to this decline, caused by sea-salt deposition. There is no evidence of changes in surface water nitrate concentrations. The influence of different land management is evident in the sulphate, nitrate and pH data, whilst variations in calcium concentrations are also a product of differences in hydrological routing and the impact of sea-salt episodes.

Keywords: trend analysis, acid deposition, land management, water quality, sea-salts, Galloway, S.W. Scotland

Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Citation
Share